Agriculture Research Topic

("These are the Thrifty Types of Hard-Working Mexicans..." Workers topping sugar beets. Through the Leaves, Great Western Sugar Company, October, 1924, 563.)

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For Colorado farmers, the landscape serves as both hindrance and advantage. It’s true that rainfall is scarce in many areas, and much of the mountain terrain is too high and too cold to nurture extensive cultivation. But the land’s diversity is also its strength—Colorado’s prairies, foothills, rivers, mountain parks, valleys, mesas, and desert country all possess their natural contributions to farming and ranching. Over time, Coloradans learned how to persuade this land to bear fruit.

A.R. Loyd Orchards with buggy. Palisade Public Library Collection, Loyd Files Research Library, Museum of Western Colorado, 1979.23 #12
(A.R. Loyd Orchards with buggy. Palisade Public Library Collection, Loyd Files Research Library, Museum of Western Colorado, 1979.23 #12.)

Colorado's agricultural experience testifies to the state’s natural advantages:

(Wellington beet farmers on a tractor. Through the Leaves, Great Western Sugar Company, May-June, 1943, 47.)

For more about Colorado's agrarian past, see
Background on Colorado Agriculture

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